August Highlights in Tanah Lot PDF Print E-mail
galungan1August 2nd, Purnama Karo, or full moon in Bali is always a special day for ceremonies and festivities. Hundreds of temples all over the island celebrate their anniversary on a specific full moon each year. Since full moon is also considered as an auspicious day, hundreds of ceremonies are held in all corner of the island on this sacred day.

August 4th, Tumpek Uduh, Tumpek Uduh can also be called Tumpek Pengatag or Tumpek Pengarah or Tumpek Bubuh , is Balinese version of earth day. This special day for plants has been celebrated for centuries every 210 days. In this holiday, Balinese offers a blessing ceremony to the plants, especially the ones that give benefits to Balinese everyday life such as such as rice, coconuts, mangoes, durian, bananas, flower etc. In this special day the plants are decorated with clothes and special decoration made from coconut leaf and presented a special offering. This is the time for expressing gratitude to plants. The blessing ceremony held at every plantation and farm throughout the island.

August 9th, Kajeng Kliwon Uwudan,  a perfect moment to conduct physical and spiritual purification, to cleanse the mind, to heal sickness, to supernaturally get rid of evil elements in residential environs through specified ceremony or to wipe out the pest from agricultural fields. Kajeng Kliwon is such a sacred day that many Balinese decide to pay a visit to holy men: shamans or priests. In so doing they seek to acquire holy water, medication or instruction related to the development of psychic power. Some prefer going to the temples to pray, meditate or conduct ascetic practice to gain certain psychic power. Kajeng Kliwon is often associated with anything mystical and psychic in nature.

August 14th, Anggara Kasih Julungwangi, is a reocccuring, auspicious cleansing day for the mind of the individual family members and for the physical world and all creatures that inhabit it. At Anggara Kliwon the Balinese Hindus meditate and pray to Dewa Ludra for support to cleanse one's mind and the physical world in which one is reincarnated. Afterwards a special ceremony called metirtha gocara is held which is performed with a canang offering and wangi-wangian, sweet smelling incense and flowers at the sangga of the family temple and the plankiran (wall temple) of the bedroom.

 

August 17th, Tilem Sasih Karo, On this day extra offerings are made around the family compound, as well as some offerings placed on the ground at the entrance to the house compound. The towering 'sesajen' offerings are also often taken to the village temple. Depending on the time of year, many temples then hold various forms of entertainment for the village - dancing, wayang puppet performances, arja plays - to coincide with the special prayers for Tilem.

 

August 19 - 20th, Idul Fitri, is the first day of the Islamic month of Shawwal. It marks the end of Ramadan, which is a month of fasting and prayer. Many Muslims attend communal prayers, listen to a khutba (sermon) and give zakat al-fitr (charity in the form of food) during Eid al-Fitr.

 

August 23rd, Sugian Jawa,  is the second of three Sugian ceremonies that are performed to cleanse the bhuana agung (the environment of the individual human being, or macro-cosmos) and the bhuana alit (the micro-cosmos or the inner world of the individual human being) of negativity, and at the same time to create awareness of one's sacred inner power. The three Sugian ceremonies are (sequential). The word jawa here is equal to the word jaba (= 'outside') and refers to the bhuana agung or macro-cosmos, which is the environment of the individual human being (the counterpart of the inner world of the individual human being, the micro-cosmos or bhuana alit).

 

August 24th, Sugian Bali, is the third of three Sugian ceremonies that are performed to cleanse the bhuana agung (the environment of the individual human being, or macro-cosmos) and the bhuana alit (the micro-cosmos or the inner world of the individual human being) of negativity; at the same time they are meant to create awareness of one's sacred inner power.

 

August 26th, Penyekeban Galungan, When the day of penyekeban has arrived, the fruits that will be used for the Galungan offerings are stored in a special place so that it will be ripe in time for Galungan Day. Penyekeban is derived from the Balinese word nyekeb which means '(to) ripen fruit'. Besides its literal meaning of ripening fruit, Penyekeban also has a (more important) symbolic meaning in respect with the bhuana alit (the inner world of the individual human being). In spiritual sense the individual, just like the fruits, has to ripen in order to be in a position to siege over adharma, the selfish urges, desires, and actions of the ego. Penyekeban is also the day that the first of the Sang Kala Tiga, Sang Bhuta Galungan, descends to earth to tempt mankind to adharma.

 

August 27th, Penyajaan Galungan, During Penyajaan Galungan special cakes (generally referred to as jaja) are prepared which will be used for the Galungan offerings. Penyajaan is derived from the High Balinese word jaya which means 'glorious, victorious'. Galungan means 'to make war, to fight'.  In combination Penyajaan Galungun therefore means, 'to be victorious in the war' (against adharma). In a symbolic sense Penyajaan Galungan is the time that the Balinese Hindu's should be 'glorious and victorious' in respect with their inner struggle against adharma so they will be safe for the second symbolic temptation of the Kala-tiganing Galungan (or Sang Kala Tiga) who descends this day to earth as Sang Bhuta Dungulan.

 

August 28th, Penampahan Galungan, Penampahan day is a special day when Balinese are busily preparing offerings and dishes for the Galungan day, on the next day. While the women have been busy for days before creating beautifully woven ‘banten‘ (offerings made from young coconut leaves), the men usually wake up well before dawn to slaughter a pig that is unlucky enough to be chosen to help celebrate this occasion. Chickens may also be chosen from the collection of free-range chickens that roam around the house compound. The penjor (richly decorated bamboo pole) is also placed in the front of gate on this day.

 

August 29th, Galungan, Galungan Day is the most important holiday for Balinese. This holiday symbolizes the victory of Virtue (Dharma) over Evil (Adharma). The striking characteristic of the celebration of this holiday is ‘penjor’, a tall bamboo pole splendidly decorated with woven young coconut leaves, fruit, cakes and flowers, on the right side of every house entrance. On this holiday, Balinese pray to the temple in their finest clothes and presents specific offering to God and ancestors.

 

August 30th, Manis Galungan, the day after Galungan Day, at the Thursday of Dungulan, the 11th week of the Pawukon calendar. The purpose of this day is to cleanse the bhuana alit (= the micro cosmos, the individual human being) in a physical and spiritual sense. After the ceremony, people perform the so called nyurud (= the taking back the offerings and sharing them with the family members) as a symbol of obtaining blessings from Bhatara Hyang Guru.


August 31th, Purnama Sasih Katiga, or full moon in Bali is always a special day for ceremonies and festivities. Hundreds of temples all over the island celebrate their anniversary on a specific full moon each year. Since full moon is also considered as an auspicious day, hundreds of ceremonies are held in all corner of the island on this sacred day.