January Highlights in Tanah Lot PDF Print E-mail
tanah-lot-ceremony-ke--2January is a festive season for Balinese. There are many holidays and ceremonies that will highlight the everyday life of the island on January since Galungan, the celebration of virtue’s victory over evil, Balinese version of Christmas, is on its way. You can expect all the street of Bali is adorned with decorated bamboo poles and many other interesting holidays’ moments. There is also a special jazz performance that will bring a difference nuance for Bali festive season.
January 1, New Year's Day, is the first day of the year and is an occasion that witnesses the biggest annual celebration across all countries of the world. It is the time when we ring out the old year and welcome the present year with open arms, with eyes filled with new dreams and hearts replete with new expectations. With another year approaching soon, it's time again to gear up for New Year celebrations.
January 7, Tumpek Uduh, can also be called Tumpek Pengatag or Tumpek Pengarah or Tumpek Bubuh , is Balinese version of earth day, that have been celebrated for centuries every 210 days. In this holiday, Balinese offers a blessing ceremony to the plants, especially the ones that are used in everyday life such as such as rice, coconuts, mangoes, durian, bananas, etc. In this special day the plants are decorated with clothes and special decoration made from coconut leaf and presented a special offering. Plants are seen as human relatives, as they are also part of God’s family. This is the time for expressing gratitude to plants. The blessing ceremony held at every plantation and farm throughout the island.
January 8, Purnama Kepitu, Purnama, or full moon in Bali is always a special day for ceremonies and festivities. Hundreds of temples all over the island celebrate their anniversary on a specific full moon each year. Since full moon is also considered as an auspicious day, hundreds of ceremonies are held in all corner of the island on this sacred day. When a holiday such as Galungan is happen together with the purnama, the scale of the festivity and ceremony of this holyday is doubled, with more offerings and decoration than a Galungan without purnama.
January 11, Buda Cemeng Warigadean, Budha Cemeng or Budha Wage is a reocccuring auspicious day for meditation and cleansing the mind of negativity. At this day, which is also known as the day of Sang Hyang Mankik Galih who descended as Sang Hyang Ongkara Mreta to the physical world, the Balinese Hindus pray to Dewa Sang Hyang Sri Nini for prosperity and protection with special offerings. The intended cleansing of the mind starts with a special ceremony called metirtha gocara which is performed with a canang offering and wangi-wangian, sweet smelling incense and flowers at the sangga of the family temple and the plankiran (wall temple) of the bedroom.
January 12, Kajeng Kliwon Uwudan, a perfect moment to conduct physical and spiritual purification, to cleanse the mind, to heal sickness, to supernaturally get rid of evil elements in residential environs through specified ceremony or to wipe out the pest from agricultural fields. Kajeng Kliwon is such a sacred day that many Balinese decide to pay a visit to holy men: shamans or priests. In so doing they seek to acquire holy water, medication or instruction related to the development of psychic power. Some prefer going to the temples to pray, meditate or conduct ascetic practice to gain certain psychic power. Kajeng Kliwon is often associated with anything mystical and psychic in nature.
January 17, Anggara Kasih Julungwangi, Anggara Kliwon, also known as Anggara Kasih, is a reocccuring, auspicious cleansing day for the mind of the individual family members and for the physical world and all creatures that inhabit it. At Anggara Kliwon the Balinese Hindus meditate and pray to Dewa Ludra for support to cleanse one's mind and the physical world in which one is reincarnated. Afterwards a special ceremony called metirtha gocara is held which is performed with a canang offering and wangi-wangian, sweet smelling incense and flowers at the sangga of the family temple and the plankiran (wall temple) of the bedroom.

January 22, Balinese will celebrate the Siwaratri or the Night of Siwa on this date. This holy day is devoted to Siwa or Shiva. Balinese believes that on this day, Siwa, meditates for the welfare of the world, and Siwa will bestow a pardon for sin for those who accompany him in his meditation by observing some self restrictions including Jagra (staying awake all night long), Upawasa (fasting), and Monabrata (silence). On this night, temples will be full of the congregations. They stay awake all night long, recite prayer or old religious story, chat with friend (for those who takes a lesser self- restriction) and fight the sleepy eyes as hard as possible.

January 23, Tilem Kepitu, On this day extra offerings are made around the family compound, as well as some offerings placed on the ground at the entrance to the house compound. The towering 'sesajen' offerings are also often taken to the village temple. Depending on the time of year, many temples then hold various forms of entertainment for the village - dancing, wayang puppet performances, arja plays - to coincide with the special prayers for Tilem.

January 26, Sugian Jawa, is the second of three Sugian ceremonies that are performed to cleanse the bhuana agung (the environment of the individual human being, or macro-cosmos) and the bhuana alit (the micro-cosmos or the inner world of the individual human being) of negativity, and at the same time to create awareness of one's sacred inner power. The three Sugian ceremonies are (sequential). The word jawa here is equal to the word jaba (= 'outside') and refers to the bhuana agung or macro-cosmos, which is the environment of the individual human being (the counterpart of the inner world of the individual human being, the micro-cosmos or bhuana alit). The ceremonies that are conducted during Sugian Jawa are locally known as pemretistan ring Bhatara kabeh and are intended to cleanse the bhuana agung of negativity. According lontar Sudarigama, Sugian Jawa is the auspicious day to worship all the positive powers of the (macro-)cosmos - the gods and pitara - with extra attention. During this day offerings are made in the form of aromatic flowers and incense which are presented at sacred places such as the public temples and family-temples, the direct vicinity of these sacred places, and sacred objects belonging to these places, to honor the gods and the pitara (the deified spirits of the ancestors). The cleansing of the environment is symbolic and intended to reinforce or maintain a balance between the non-physical positive powers (gods, deified ancestors, etc.) and negative powers (bhuta-kala) of niskala, so that, with the support of the positive powers, the affairs of men will not be disturbed by these negative powers.

January 28, Sugian Bali, is the third of three Sugian ceremonies that are performed to cleanse the bhuana agung (the environment of the individual human being, or macro-cosmos) and the bhuana alit (the micro-cosmos or the inner world of the individual human being) of negativity; at the same time they are meant to create awareness of one's sacred inner power. In Sanskrit the word bali means 'inner power', which refers to the bhuana alit or micro-cosmos, the environment of the individual human being (the counterpart of the environment of the individual human being, the macro-cosmos or bhuana agung). The ceremonies of Sugian Bali are intended to cleanse the bhuana alit (the inner world of the individual human being or the micro-cosmos) of negativity so that he/she will be able (again) to enclose and utilize this inner power in an appropiate, spiritual way. The ceremonies are conducted at the local temples with prayers and special offerings. At the end of the ceremonies one is symbolically cleansed of inner negativity by a pemangku (lay priest) or pedanda (high priest) with purifying sacred water called tirta penglukatan.

January 28, Kajeng Kliwon Enyitan, Kajeng Kliwon is the day that has these two influences at the same time. For that reason, Kajeng Kliwon has magical power and therefor is a special day in Tanah Lot Bali. On this day extra offerings are made in the house compound, and offerings are placed at the front entrance gate on the ground, burning a coconut husk to provide smoke. Kliwon Enyitan is to increase the positive powers. The rituals of both are based on sincerity and honesty.

January 29, Penyekeban Day is the beginning of Galungan series of holidays. Penyekeban day for Balinese is always a day for cultivating self-restraint. Not only spiritual activity is observed, but there are many physical activities in relation with the preparation to celebrate the day of victory (Galungan) are performed today. Green bananas are sealed in huge clay pots upon which a small coconut husk fire burns. Lots of bananas are required for Galungan offerings, and this heat treatment ripens them quickly.

January 30, Penyajaan day is a day of cookies. Various fried rice-dough cookies are made for offering on Galungan (the day of victory).  Penyajaan Galungan is also devoted for meditation and self control.

January 31, Penampahan day is the day when Balinese are busily preparing offerings and cooking for the Galungan day. While the women have been busy for days before creating beautifully woven ‘banten‘ (offerings made from young coconut leaves), the men usually wake up well before dawn to join with their neighbors to slaughter a pig unlucky enough to be chosen to help celebrate this occasion. Chickens may also be chosen from the collection of free-range chickens that roam around the house compound. The penjor (richly decorated bamboo pole) is also placed in the front of gate. This is ultimate preparation day for the day of victory on the next day.